A Limited Guide to Business Presentation Papers

Everything about how your business looks reflects on how your business works. From resumes and daily information management to proposals and presentations, your business needs to look its best in today’s marketplace. In this short guide, we’ll explain the products we offer and the applications for these products.

Bond paper is a high quality durable writing paper similar to old style bank paper. It gets its name from having originally been made for documents such as government bonds. In the modern business place, it is most often used for letterheads and other stationery as well as paper for electronic printers. For day to day operations, building presentation guides on a budget, and hard copies of large data, bond paper is the paper of choice. Because bond paper is in high demand, the selection comes in many sizes, colors and textures.

Paper made of linen can be very strong and crisp, which is why the United States and many other countries print their currency on paper that is made from 25% linen and 75% cotton. Most wedding invitations and commencement announcements are printed on linen paper. For an executive and exquisite look and feel, linen paper is a time-tested favorite. Irish linen paper is a pH Neutral, recycled content, chlorine free paper made from wood certified and audited to ensure it complies with environmentally sustainable practice and principles known as “Well Managed Forest Standards.” It is manufactured to resemble and mimic traditional linen paper while being environmentally conscious.

Offset printing is most often used for large quantity, single run documents such as tests and newspapers. In this process, an inked image is transferred from a plate to a blank cylinder, which in turn transfers the image to the printing material as it passes between the blanket and the impression cylinder and pressure is applied. This is also called “offset lithography.” Offset paper is paper that has been manufactured with properties that make the paper suitable for this process. Some of the properties include dimensional stability, resistance to curling, high surface strength, a surface free from and/or resistant to foreign particles and a high level of resistance to moisture penetration.

Finished paper is most commonly used in magazines and other publications as well as in the office as specialty printer paper for sleek, stunning presentations. Gloss Finish is a coating on paper that provides a higher reflection of light which results in a shiny appearance. Gloss coatings reduce ink absorption, which allows excellent contrast and color definition. Matte finish is a coated paper finish that is flat, not shiny like a gloss, but still keeps much of the ink from being absorbed by the paper and produces an excellent image. Dull finish is a flat finish that has been supercalendered when manufactured. Supercalendering is an additional papermaking process where the paper runs through a set of alternating steel and fiber covered rollers. Supercalendering produces a very smooth thin sheet. It is slightly smoother that a matte finish. Kromekote is a premium glossy coating. It provides an extremely flat, ultra-rich high gloss and a highly absorbent surface. Kromekote coating is most often used on digital photo paper of all densities from light bond paper to heavy, rigid cardstock.

Of course, as in other areas of business, there are some brand names that stand head and shoulders above the rest. Some of the best include Springhill offset, Kromekote coated paper, and Valley Forge paper. Presentation is a delicate time, and it’s best to go with the tried and true producers. By paying attention to all details, even such as these, your business will grow to unprecedented heights.

Five Strategies to Negotiate Any Sale

The sales negotiation process can seem like a miserable chore when the parties involved resort to underhanded tactics and sneaky methods to get what they want. But one of the most important aspects of effective negotiation is that everyone leaves satisfied, not feeling like they’ve been swindled out of a good deal. To prevent this cheated feeling, you need to follow a strategy for your negotiations.

No matter what you’re selling, or to whom, you need a reliable negotiation strategy that enables both parties to succeed in the deal. Think of your strategy as your master plan, or systematic approach. Since any strategy is only as strong as the techniques and tactics you use, think of tactics as the tools for implementing your negotiation strategy.

Without a solid strategy in place and the right tools for the job, you are likely to succumb to ineffective negotiation tactics and may end up losing sales or not getting the best outcome for you and your company. Use the following five strategies to negotiate effectively.

1. Always be Prepared

You wouldn’t jump out of an airplane without a parachute, and you wouldn’t climb a mountain without prior preparation, so why should negotiating be any different? All effective negotiations start before you actually sit down at the bargaining table. So don’t jump in without any research or planning. Take time to consider your counterpart’s situation. Ask yourself what they need from the deal, and know what you can and cannot compromise.

Negotiations for a year-long service contract will obviously require more preparation than for a one-time purchase of a product. But regardless, use preparation to gain a comprehensive view of the situation. Preparation and planned alternatives will help you stay relaxed through the negotiation. And remember that the more you know about the deal in question, the easier it will be to arrange the best solution for everyone involved.

2. Set Objective Negotiating Standards

If you want to reach a mutually beneficial agreement, everyone has to play the negotiation game by the same set of rules. Objective negotiating standards are like a set of rules established before the process starts. Many times, these standards are set by the organization, or by a government law. For example, most banks won’t grant a loan to someone buying a home until that house has been inspected and declared structurally sound. This rule is a standard that must be met before the bartering can even begin.

In most cases, you can set your own rules. For example, if you’re negotiating a carpet cleaning service contract, you may approach your client with the competitor’s price and what the client currently pays for regular cleanings as some standards for the process. By setting guidelines prior to the negotiation, you ensure that everyone operates under the same standards and everything runs smoothly.

3. Work With, Not Against, the Other Party

Good negotiations mean all parties leave the table feeling good about the agreement and about each other. In order for this to occur, everyone involved must strive for mutually beneficial solutions. When you approach the situation with this attitude of mutual satisfaction, the other party will usually disarm. Most people only get defensive when they feel like you’re out to swindle them. But if the other party knows you want to play fair, they try to play fair as well.

However, you may come across some people who don’t agree with the concept of fair play. Unfortunately, some people, regardless of how you approach negotiations, won’t play by the same high standards. No matter what you do, these individuals are prepared for battle and may bring out the heavy artillery, such as intimidation and manipulation. But you can’t stoop to their level, no matter how tempted you may be. Keep the possibility of an unfair counterpart in mind, but don’t abandon your strategy for fair play.

4. Finalize All Agreements

Keep in mind that the point of negotiation is to arrange the best deal for everyone, so ask plenty of questions. Don’t let important details slip through, and perhaps more important, listen to the client’s responses and concerns. If they are worried about customer service, or the contract length, or routine repairs on the product, then address these issues with care. When the terms are settled, make sure everyone’s perceptions match, and recap all the important details.

Depending on the impact of the deal, you may decide to put the terms in writing, such as a sales contract or agreement. Keep a copy for your records, and give the other party a copy as well. Then if any questions arise, you’ll both have a copy of the answers. And don’t sign off until both parties understand all the key points. Don’t leave any details hanging, and make sure everyone agrees to all the terms and knows what is expected.

5. Follow Through

Once you’ve negotiated the sale, developed mutually beneficial solutions, and signed the agreements, you must follow through on your part. This means you do what you said you would do, when you said you would do it, and in the manner you said it would be done. For example, if you said you’d deliver a product or service on a certain day, then make sure it’s there. If for some reason you can’t follow through as expected, make sure you contact the other party and discuss alternative arrangements.

Also, make sure the other people involved in the agreement follow through as well. Unfortunately, at some time in your sales career, you’ll inevitably run into some people who blow off agreements. In this case, you must protect yourself. But as a general rule, for everything you give, you must expect to get something in return.

Negotiating Conclusions

Negotiation is a process of give-and-take for everyone involved. When you follow a strategy, you can focus on finding solutions, rather than winning a position. Preparation gives you a comprehensive view of the situation, and standards serve as guidelines for compromise. Remember to work with, not against, your counterpart, and then finalize all the details you’ve agreed upon. Most important, once you’ve completed the negotiation process, keep your word and follow through with the deal.

As a salesperson, you naturally want your customer to be satisfied, but you also need to benefit from your hard work. When you use these strategies every time you negotiate a sale, both parties will come away pleased, and you’ll win more clients in the process.

Biography

Evaluations – Practice Being a Coach to Improve Your Presentations

Do you watch Dancing with the Stars? One of the three judges is Bruno Tonioli. Usually, I have a problem with him. Particularly when he addresses the contestants. It is at that time that he will usually express himself in a manner such as “You need to work on your rhythm. You looked like Shrek lumbering about for your dinner!”

PU-LEASE! Is that type of comment necessary? I hope you will agree it is not. Perhaps, in the style of Simon Cowell, they hope to boost ratings. But let’s take a look at it from a public speaking standpoint.

Tonight, Bruno said to one of the worst dancers, “You were on, you were off, your were on… You had a section in the middle where you were with the music, but you need to work on that. Work on staying with the music.”

Don’t you think that is better than, “You look like a broken juke box! Skipping and jumping and not keeping the rhythm.”

As a presenter, you can learn two things from this. First, connect with your audience. Don’t alienate them. If you can connect with your audience, they are more likely to listen, to consider, and maybe to see it your way. That is true whether you are evaluating them, or whether your are presenting a new business proposal or donation request.

Second, learn from evaluations. Learn from others’ evaluations wherever you find them. And if you can’t find them, do them yourselves. Evaluate people. Do it in your head if necessary. Get used to noticing the things that you yourself need to work on. Maybe even by noticing mistakes in others, you will notice that you have the same problem which you didn’t notice before.

It is similar to when you purchase a new car. Before you bought that car, whatever make or model, you didn’t notice that particular car on the road. But once you bought it, you notice every one on the road. The same goes with any type of expertise. The more you watch for it, the more you notice it, the more easily you pick it up in the future. This can be used to your advantage. Look for good and bad presentation techniques in others and you will start to notice them in yourself.

By the way, there is a term for that sensitivity. I heard it on the radio last month. Do you know what it is?