Six Tips To Present Your Visiting Card In A Professional Way

Is there a preferred way of handing out a visiting card? What impression do you create in your customer’s mind while you hand over your visiting card? Read on to find the answers.

Your objective in handing out your card:

If you are making a sales visit, your objective is more than just introducing yourself with your visiting card. Your objective is to accord enough value to your card, that your prospect finds it worthy enough to be filed in his rolodex. He should see your name in his choice set, every time he considers using a service offered by you.

It is essential to follow a certain simple rules to achieve that objective. Here are the 6 rules:

1. Your visiting card is YOU:

Your visiting card represents you. This is not just because it bears your name, designation and your organization details but because it represents far more than the material written on the card. Your prospect will treat you with the same respect that you treat your visiting card. Take a moment to reflect how you handover your card now.

2. Invest in a good quality visiting card holder:

If your card is crumpled, it reflects as a poor self identity. A crisp card taken out of a professional looking card holder leaves a good first impression. It tells your prospect that you deserve to be treated with the same respect. So, invest some money to get yourself a good quality visiting card holder. Make it a habit to pull out your card only from that case.

3. Keep it readily accessible:

Searching for your visiting card reflects poorly on your organizing skills. Allocate a certain place where you keep your visiting cards, and you should be able to access it in less than 2 seconds. The time you are with your prospect is valuable. Do not waste it in searching for your card.

4. Present it with your name facing the customer:

Your customer should be able to read the material written on the visiting card. Do not cover any portion of your card with your fingers. Hold the card on its sides and present with your name facing the customer.

5. Stand up while extending your card:

This gesture tells that you accord value to your card. This also increases the chance of your card being read and later being filed in your prospect’s rolodex.

6. Give a ten seconds introduction of the service you provide:

Very few prospects actually read what is written on your card. So, it is always a good idea to tell them about how you can add value to your prospect with your service. Read our blog on how to create a 2 minute pitch to introduce your service effectively. This pitch comes in handy to make a quick presentation with just your card as a visual aid.

Follow these simple rules and see a visible difference in the way you are treated by your prospects. They will listen with far more interest to the presentation that you make later.

A Guide to a Successful Salary Negotiation

Whether you are are seeking for a new job offer or asking for a pay raise, salary negotiation is definitely a task that not many are a fond of doing. However, if you want to get the salary that you know you deserve, you have to do it so you might as well know how to do it successfully. With this guide, you will be able to learn exactly what you have to do to get that pay you have been working hard for.

When in talks for your salary, so that you know the right amount to ask for, research on the salaries of others in the field with the same position as you. You can do this by checking out salary surveys, talking to others who have the same occupation, and even by contacting the professional association in your area. Salaries differ by region so your research has to be relevant only to your area of work.

Once you have an idea of what amount to ask, you need to make sure that it can be backed up with your experience and accomplishments in the past. The more achievements you have, the more money you can possibly earn. If you feel that you don’t have much experience, it is OK but you need to be reasonable in the salary that you request for.

It is quite likely that you won’t be granted the exact amount you ask for because the company will always negotiate. Basically you have two options, you can either put a buffer in your request so that when they negotiate you will still end up with the rate you are satisfied with or you can simply compromise and figure out what amount you find acceptable. You can even do both options if you’d like but always be prepared to compromise that is why it is called a negotiation.

When you do a salary negotiation, never talk about the amount of money you need, it is always about what you deserve. What you earn is given to you based on your performance on the job and not because you have all these bills to pay. If you want to be paid well, then you need to work hard and show that you are deserving of such because complaining about your expenses isn’t going to get you anywhere.

Simply following these instructions will be of great assistance to you in achieving a successful salary negotiation. Just remember as long as you deserve it and you are ready to show why you deserve such amount, then you won’t have any difficulty getting that salary.

How to Negotiate Your Franchise Agreement

An individual who signs a franchise agreement is executing a valid legal contract. It requires the franchisee to fulfill certain obligations and follow guidelines for operating their franchise.

Before you sign the franchise agreement you need to be comfortable with all of its provisions. In order to achieve this comfort level you and your franchise attorney may feel it necessary for the franchisor to make changes to the agreement. Some franchisors will negotiate terms of their franchise agreement while others will not. Quite often, the decision to negotiate is based upon the size and maturity of the franchisor. The larger franchisors find it much easier to say “no”. Although franchisors are guided by franchise regulations, state statutes and sound business practice, certain provisions can be negotiated and changed.

Before you arrive at the point of negotiating your franchise agreement there is a process you’ll need to follow.

· Engage An Experienced Franchise Attorney To Review The Agreement

· Confirm That The Franchisor Will Negotiate Terms Of The Agreement. Some franchisors will not make any changes to their agreement. On the other hand some franchisors may have unreasonable or onerous terms in their franchise agreement. In order to protect yourself make sure your attorney reviews the agreement to identify any possible issues even though you can’t negotiate the agreement.

· Recognize That Certain Terms Are Non-Negotiable

Royalty fees, territory size, termination provisions, length of the agreement, non-competes and legal venue are examples of what are considered the “untouchable” provisions. Few if any franchisors will negotiate or change these provisions.

· Focus On The Important Points In The Agreement. Restrictions on products and services that you wish to sell

· Indemnification Provisions. Be careful that you’re not held liable for loses or damages that are not caused directly by the acts of you or your employees. You may request language, which does not require you to indemnify the franchisor if you follow the procedures and policies of the franchisor.

· Advertising. Provisions that require you to spend a set dollar amount or per-cent of sales on advertising may be lowered during your first few years of operation.

· The Transfer and Assignment Section. Be sure your attorney carefully reviews this section and that you understand your responsibilities and rights.

These represent some of the more noteworthy examples of sections in a franchise agreement, which you and your attorney may wish to negotiate. A franchise agreement is a complicated document and by design is favors the franchisor.

Make sure that before you sign on the “dotted line” you fully understand your obligations and are comfortable with the final agreement.

Before you sign the franchise agreement you need to be comfortable with all of its provisions. In order to achieve this comfort level you and your franchise attorney may feel it necessary for the franchisor to make changes to the agreement. Some franchisors will negotiate terms of their franchise agreement while others will not. Quite often, the decision to negotiate is based upon the size and maturity of the franchisor. The larger franchisors find it much easier to say “no”. Although franchisors are guided by franchise regulations, state statutes and sound business practice, certain provisions can be negotiated and changed.

Before you arrive at the point of negotiating your franchise agreement there is a process you’ll need to follow.

· Engage An Experienced Franchise Attorney To Review The Agreement

· Confirm That The Franchisor Will Negotiate Terms Of The Agreement. Some franchisors will not make any changes to their agreement. On the other hand some franchisors may have unreasonable or onerous terms in their franchise agreement. In order to protect yourself make sure your attorney reviews the agreement to identify any possible issues even though you can’t negotiate the agreement.

· Recognize That Certain Terms Are Non-Negotiable

Royalty fees, territory size, termination provisions, length of the agreement, non-competes and legal venue are examples of what are considered the “untouchable” provisions. Few if any franchisors will negotiate or change these provisions.

· Focus On The Important Points In The Agreement. Restrictions on products and services that you wish to sell

· Indemnification Provisions. Be careful that you’re not held liable for loses or damages that are not caused directly by the acts of you or your employees. You may request language, which does not require you to indemnify the franchisor if you follow the procedures and policies of the franchisor.

· Advertising. Provisions that require you to spend a set dollar amount or per-cent of sales on advertising may be lowered during your first few years of operation.

· The Transfer and Assignment Section. Be sure your attorney carefully reviews this section and that you understand your responsibilities and rights.

These represent some of the more noteworthy examples of sections in a franchise agreement, which you and your attorney may wish to negotiate. A franchise agreement is a complicated document and by design is favors the franchisor.

Make sure that before you sign on the “dotted line” you fully understand your obligations and are comfortable with the final agreement.